Resistance to Brown Stem Rot May Be Needed in Future Soybean Varieties for New York State

Wednesday, December 9, 2015
Split soybean stem with brown stem rot

By: Jaime A. Cummings and Gary C. Bergstrom - Cornell University


"A potentially yield-reducing disease called ‘brown stem rot’ (BSR) was confirmed for the first time in New York soybean fields in 2013, and was found again in 2014.  It showed up in some plants from soybean fields in Cayuga, Herkimer, Niagara, and Yates Counties collected by Cornell Cooperative Extension Educators Kevin Ganoe, Keith Severson, Michael Stanyard, and Bill Verbeten, with support from the New York Soybean Check-off Program.  The disease was diagnosed in the Field Crops Pathology Laboratory at Cornell based on characteristic symptoms and the laboratory isolation of the causal fungus and confirmation of a portion of its signature DNA sequence.


So far, BSR has not been detected outside of the four counties mentioned above.  It is noteworthy that BSR was not detected in soybean fields in northern New York scouted in 2013 and 2014 by CCE Educators Michael Hunter and Kitty O’Neil, with support from the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program.


Brown stem rot is caused by the fungus Cadophora gregata (syn. Phialophora gregata) and occurs in most soybean production regions of the US, but this is, to our knowledge, the first confirmation in New York or the northeastern U.S.  Reported yield losses in the Midwest have ranged from minor to in excess of 25%, so the presence of the pathogen is considered a significant factor for soybean production.”


Link to full study: Resistance to Brown Stem Rot May Be Needed in Future Soybean Varieties for New York State


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